Do You Need RV Toilet Paper? Hoax or Shrewd Reality?

A bunch of toilet paper rolls stacked on top of each other. Is RV toilet paper worth it?

With rising RV prices and improving technology, we’re seeing tremendous growth in accessories and gadgets targeting RVers. RV toilet paper is one of those items. It might have you questioning if you should use RV toilet paper or if regular old TP will do. Let’s take a look and see if you’d be wasting your money.

Why You Should Use RV Toilet Paper

RV plumbing systems are not like residential septic systems. A residential septic system is precisely engineered to break down toilet paper and sewage over time. RV black tanks should only hold sewage for a short time, so regular paper probably won’t dissolve fast enough. 

RV toilet paper will break down at a much faster rate. This is essential because undissolved toilet paper causes clogs in the plumbing system, which will strain not only your RV’s plumbing system but also your black tank. If you’ve never had the humbling experience of unclogging an RV black tank, it’s no picnic! 

When you use RV toilet paper, you protect yourself from facing every RVers worst nightmare: a “poopsie,” which is when an RVer has a raw sewage accident. The embarrassment and awkwardness only amplify if this happens in a campground. Having an entire campground smell the contents of your RV’s black tank is the ultimate sense of defeat.

Four toilet paper rolls unroll across a dark blue backdrop.

What Makes RV Toilet Paper Special?

RV toilet paper is thinner and loosely composed, which significantly accelerates the dissolving process. Once this TP makes contact with liquid, it will begin to break down. This instant process helps minimize the potential for clogs in your RV’s plumbing system.

Can You Use Septic-Safe Toilet Paper in Your RV?

Yes, but bathroom users should still be mindful of their paper usage. Flushing a large amount of toilet paper, whether septic safe or not, is a recipe for a potential issue. If your favorite brand is labeled as “septic safe,” then the odds are favorable that you’ll have limited problems in an RV. 

There’s a relatively easy test to determine toilet paper’s safeness for an RV’s black tank. Read on to learn more. 

A hand pulls one sheet of toilet paper off the roll.

Try the “Dissolving Test”

The “dissolving test” only requires a few pieces of your favorite toilet paper, a transparent jar with a lid, and a generous amount of water inside it. Take the TP pieces you want to test and place them in the jar. Replace the jar lid and shake the jar a few times.

After a few good shakes, it should be evident if the toilet paper is breaking down or not. If necessary, give it a few more shakes for good measure. At this point, the toilet paper composition should be changing into bits. 

If there’s been little or no change, don’t use this toilet paper in your RV.

The Best RV Toilet Paper

One of the best and most popular brands for RV toilet paper is Scott’s Rapid Dissolving. It’s Scott’s answer to consumers looking to avoid potential clogs in their septic or even RV plumbing system.

While Scott’s is one of the leading brands in this category, it’s relatively inexpensive. You may already be using this specific line of toilet paper. If so, you won’t have to make any adjustments! It’s a great value and will give you the peace of mind that you’re less likely to face a clogged black tank.

Scott Rapid Dissolving Toilet Paper, Bath Tissue for RVs and Boats, 4 Rolls (Pack of 12)
  • Includes 4 rolls with 231 sheets per roll
  • Soft, absorbent sheets are gentle on skin

It’s safe to say that your RV’s plumbing system is one feature you want to run optimally at all times. Using a well-known RV toilet paper or doing the dissolving test for your favorite brand are both essential for peace of mind.

Last update on 2021-09-20 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

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10 comments
  1. you should discuss the option of not putting TP down the drain, put it in the trash for an even better solution, like the European way. for residential, remember that EVERYTHING that goes down the drain ends up in the water you drink.

  2. I agree! Use your favorite paper and put it in a small garbage container, NOT into your RV’s ceptic system!! Put a disposable bag in it and toss weekly.

  3. Charmin Ultra soft dissolves faster than most so-called RV toilet paper and is soft on your bum. Much cheaper as well. Personally I figure RV special toilet paper is an the edge of being a scam.

  4. We don’t even flush TP down our toilet. It always goes in the trash. I didn’t know Europeans generally do this.

  5. No toilet paper no problem all you glampers can stuff the toilet paper you want and pay to resolve the issues .Old school is keep it in a waste paper baskit and issue resolved! .Its not a yucky issue but a keep it simpler to enjoy life on the road with simple pump outs

  6. I agree with daveyusa. No tp down the RV toilet for us. Just use a lined can with a lid next to the toilet and dump it at every fuel station or trash receptacle you can. Wrap it up and tie it in a grocery bag. Much better than having to dig it out of your black tank. Also, always put a couple of gallons of water in your black tank BEFORE using it, after every clean out. Keeping your tank as liquid as possible is the best tip.

  7. We use whatever we find cheap in the store, because we don’t put paper down our RV toilet. It goes into a can with a ‘pop up’ lid with a shopping bag liner after we do our business. If it smells, it gets dumped and a fresh bag installed. No possibility of a paper clog this way.

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